Still There

"Still There" by Best Friend // Swallow - Single (Out Now via Bandcamp)

The Nashville based shoegaze crew, Best Friend, has been releasing a solid collection of strong material all year long. In addition to the February release of their full length, Division, the band has actively dropped singles and one off tracks on their Soundcloud and Bandcamp page. In fact, this week saw the release of their stunning new single, “Swallow”, which is a lovely bit of late night dream pop. The B-side to that single is just as good, and can also be streamed right now. “Still There” brushes off the shimmering beauty of “Swallow” in exchange for widescreen, reverb drenched shoegaze guitars, textured walls of noise, and dreamy, airy vocals. It’s some of the best straight-up shoegaze that i’ve heard in a while and you can grab it for free, right now from Soundcloud and Bandcamp.

DREAMING IN REVERSE // #006
"A Day in the Graveyard II" by Sunset Rubdown (2006 // Global Symphonic)
I’ve been neglecting this little series that I began a couple of months back. It’s nothing more really than an excuse to post and perhaps shine a little light on some favorites of the past, but that’s a noble enough cause for me - so, please allow me to step back into the Dreaming in Reverse series, with a look at an early favorite from Spencer Krug. 
By January of 2006, I was deeply enamored with all things Wolf Parade. Especially the work of Spencer Krug. I had already played the living hell out of his first release as Sunset Rubdown (Snakes Got a Leg), and was in the midst of a several month long obsession with his contribution to the 2005 Believer Music issues, which was a stripped bare, haunting cover of a Frog Eyes track called “Claxxon’s Lament”. Thankfully, I was living with like minded friends at the time, so there was very little chance I would be choked to death for overplaying the same 20 or 30 songs whenever I got drunk enough to turn our kitchen/living room space into a bad karaoke party for those particular tracks. So, that January saw the release of a new Sunset Rubdown EP, which I was excited to get my hands on. The order had been placed, it was just a waiting game at that point, and a waiting I was. In fact, I was frustrated beyond belief that the EP was a couple of weeks late. The general excitement of life in New York that winter had managed to help me forget about my obsession - or rather, it helped develop multiple other obsessions with various other acts at that time. Sometime in February, I was coming home from work late, and upon checking my postal box, found those ordered copies, opened and seemingly listened to by someone in my building. I managed to push off the anger and annoyance for long enough to get inside and pop a copy into the stereo while I cleaned up and made a bite to eat.
Something strange happened. The first song played and failed to grab me. Then the next. And then a third. Still nothing magical. I killed the music and sat down for the night, already over the whole release. My year and a half long obsession must have subsided in the interim of receiving that EP. 
It wasn’t until early that spring, when I was walking through the East Village on my way to a birthday party for one of my roommates, that I remembered that I had added the Sunset Rubdown EP to my iPod, and decided to give it another shot. It must have been the general upbeat vibe of a breezy night on the town just after the cold breaks, because I was hearing those first three songs with new ears. I had tempered my expectations for sure, but I found myself getting caught up in the sound, which was an evolution of sorts for Krug’s sound. Less chaotic and more melodic and warm. Then I heard the buoyant intro to the fourth track, “A Day in the Graveyard II”. I was completely caught off guard. It was short, just over two minutes, but basically containing a thirty second intro of noise - but that melody, and the sweetly romantic composition just floored me. It felt like the Spring season opened up in the span of this one song, and everything felt curious and alive. I set the track to repeat as I made my way to the party. My mind dissecting the lyrics and imagining some film scene played out to the track - a lost lover pining for his absent other but accepting the end with an optimistic hope, rather than wallowing in pain. By the time I had arrived at the bar, I had already listened to the song a handful of times, and I even waited outside for the track to play through one last time before I stowed away the ipod in my bag. I remember that night so well, because I couldn’t stop humming, singing, and generally emoting that song - breaking it out and playing it for anyone who would listen. It was the kind of excitement for a song that doesn’t come along very often, but when it does it makes you fall in love with all music, not just the gem in question. 
By that point, Sunset Rubdown and Wolf Parade were just a part of my regular rotation, and Krug’s inability to stop and breath between projects kept me in new material of his for most of the next several years, but still to this day there’s something about re-discovering “A Day in the Graveyard II” that just sticks with me. It became a bit of a theme song for me that year, which found me in the midst of a slew of life changes, lost friends, and eye opening realizations - and even still, it’s nearly impossible for me to just listen to the song once and to move on. It always grabs my complete attention, and here eight years later - that’s a pretty impressive feat, and one that is not lost on me. Spencer Krug has continued to evolve and grow as an artist (I can no longer say this or one of his early achievements stand as my favorite), but in doing so, it’s impossible to forget the places that grabbed me first. 
LISTEN to “A DAY IN THE GRAVEYARD II” by SUNSET RUBDOWN: (Soundcloud) // (YouTube) // (iTunes)
ZoomInfo
DREAMING IN REVERSE // #006
"A Day in the Graveyard II" by Sunset Rubdown (2006 // Global Symphonic)
I’ve been neglecting this little series that I began a couple of months back. It’s nothing more really than an excuse to post and perhaps shine a little light on some favorites of the past, but that’s a noble enough cause for me - so, please allow me to step back into the Dreaming in Reverse series, with a look at an early favorite from Spencer Krug. 
By January of 2006, I was deeply enamored with all things Wolf Parade. Especially the work of Spencer Krug. I had already played the living hell out of his first release as Sunset Rubdown (Snakes Got a Leg), and was in the midst of a several month long obsession with his contribution to the 2005 Believer Music issues, which was a stripped bare, haunting cover of a Frog Eyes track called “Claxxon’s Lament”. Thankfully, I was living with like minded friends at the time, so there was very little chance I would be choked to death for overplaying the same 20 or 30 songs whenever I got drunk enough to turn our kitchen/living room space into a bad karaoke party for those particular tracks. So, that January saw the release of a new Sunset Rubdown EP, which I was excited to get my hands on. The order had been placed, it was just a waiting game at that point, and a waiting I was. In fact, I was frustrated beyond belief that the EP was a couple of weeks late. The general excitement of life in New York that winter had managed to help me forget about my obsession - or rather, it helped develop multiple other obsessions with various other acts at that time. Sometime in February, I was coming home from work late, and upon checking my postal box, found those ordered copies, opened and seemingly listened to by someone in my building. I managed to push off the anger and annoyance for long enough to get inside and pop a copy into the stereo while I cleaned up and made a bite to eat.
Something strange happened. The first song played and failed to grab me. Then the next. And then a third. Still nothing magical. I killed the music and sat down for the night, already over the whole release. My year and a half long obsession must have subsided in the interim of receiving that EP. 
It wasn’t until early that spring, when I was walking through the East Village on my way to a birthday party for one of my roommates, that I remembered that I had added the Sunset Rubdown EP to my iPod, and decided to give it another shot. It must have been the general upbeat vibe of a breezy night on the town just after the cold breaks, because I was hearing those first three songs with new ears. I had tempered my expectations for sure, but I found myself getting caught up in the sound, which was an evolution of sorts for Krug’s sound. Less chaotic and more melodic and warm. Then I heard the buoyant intro to the fourth track, “A Day in the Graveyard II”. I was completely caught off guard. It was short, just over two minutes, but basically containing a thirty second intro of noise - but that melody, and the sweetly romantic composition just floored me. It felt like the Spring season opened up in the span of this one song, and everything felt curious and alive. I set the track to repeat as I made my way to the party. My mind dissecting the lyrics and imagining some film scene played out to the track - a lost lover pining for his absent other but accepting the end with an optimistic hope, rather than wallowing in pain. By the time I had arrived at the bar, I had already listened to the song a handful of times, and I even waited outside for the track to play through one last time before I stowed away the ipod in my bag. I remember that night so well, because I couldn’t stop humming, singing, and generally emoting that song - breaking it out and playing it for anyone who would listen. It was the kind of excitement for a song that doesn’t come along very often, but when it does it makes you fall in love with all music, not just the gem in question. 
By that point, Sunset Rubdown and Wolf Parade were just a part of my regular rotation, and Krug’s inability to stop and breath between projects kept me in new material of his for most of the next several years, but still to this day there’s something about re-discovering “A Day in the Graveyard II” that just sticks with me. It became a bit of a theme song for me that year, which found me in the midst of a slew of life changes, lost friends, and eye opening realizations - and even still, it’s nearly impossible for me to just listen to the song once and to move on. It always grabs my complete attention, and here eight years later - that’s a pretty impressive feat, and one that is not lost on me. Spencer Krug has continued to evolve and grow as an artist (I can no longer say this or one of his early achievements stand as my favorite), but in doing so, it’s impossible to forget the places that grabbed me first. 
LISTEN to “A DAY IN THE GRAVEYARD II” by SUNSET RUBDOWN: (Soundcloud) // (YouTube) // (iTunes)
ZoomInfo
DREAMING IN REVERSE // #006
"A Day in the Graveyard II" by Sunset Rubdown (2006 // Global Symphonic)
I’ve been neglecting this little series that I began a couple of months back. It’s nothing more really than an excuse to post and perhaps shine a little light on some favorites of the past, but that’s a noble enough cause for me - so, please allow me to step back into the Dreaming in Reverse series, with a look at an early favorite from Spencer Krug. 
By January of 2006, I was deeply enamored with all things Wolf Parade. Especially the work of Spencer Krug. I had already played the living hell out of his first release as Sunset Rubdown (Snakes Got a Leg), and was in the midst of a several month long obsession with his contribution to the 2005 Believer Music issues, which was a stripped bare, haunting cover of a Frog Eyes track called “Claxxon’s Lament”. Thankfully, I was living with like minded friends at the time, so there was very little chance I would be choked to death for overplaying the same 20 or 30 songs whenever I got drunk enough to turn our kitchen/living room space into a bad karaoke party for those particular tracks. So, that January saw the release of a new Sunset Rubdown EP, which I was excited to get my hands on. The order had been placed, it was just a waiting game at that point, and a waiting I was. In fact, I was frustrated beyond belief that the EP was a couple of weeks late. The general excitement of life in New York that winter had managed to help me forget about my obsession - or rather, it helped develop multiple other obsessions with various other acts at that time. Sometime in February, I was coming home from work late, and upon checking my postal box, found those ordered copies, opened and seemingly listened to by someone in my building. I managed to push off the anger and annoyance for long enough to get inside and pop a copy into the stereo while I cleaned up and made a bite to eat.
Something strange happened. The first song played and failed to grab me. Then the next. And then a third. Still nothing magical. I killed the music and sat down for the night, already over the whole release. My year and a half long obsession must have subsided in the interim of receiving that EP. 
It wasn’t until early that spring, when I was walking through the East Village on my way to a birthday party for one of my roommates, that I remembered that I had added the Sunset Rubdown EP to my iPod, and decided to give it another shot. It must have been the general upbeat vibe of a breezy night on the town just after the cold breaks, because I was hearing those first three songs with new ears. I had tempered my expectations for sure, but I found myself getting caught up in the sound, which was an evolution of sorts for Krug’s sound. Less chaotic and more melodic and warm. Then I heard the buoyant intro to the fourth track, “A Day in the Graveyard II”. I was completely caught off guard. It was short, just over two minutes, but basically containing a thirty second intro of noise - but that melody, and the sweetly romantic composition just floored me. It felt like the Spring season opened up in the span of this one song, and everything felt curious and alive. I set the track to repeat as I made my way to the party. My mind dissecting the lyrics and imagining some film scene played out to the track - a lost lover pining for his absent other but accepting the end with an optimistic hope, rather than wallowing in pain. By the time I had arrived at the bar, I had already listened to the song a handful of times, and I even waited outside for the track to play through one last time before I stowed away the ipod in my bag. I remember that night so well, because I couldn’t stop humming, singing, and generally emoting that song - breaking it out and playing it for anyone who would listen. It was the kind of excitement for a song that doesn’t come along very often, but when it does it makes you fall in love with all music, not just the gem in question. 
By that point, Sunset Rubdown and Wolf Parade were just a part of my regular rotation, and Krug’s inability to stop and breath between projects kept me in new material of his for most of the next several years, but still to this day there’s something about re-discovering “A Day in the Graveyard II” that just sticks with me. It became a bit of a theme song for me that year, which found me in the midst of a slew of life changes, lost friends, and eye opening realizations - and even still, it’s nearly impossible for me to just listen to the song once and to move on. It always grabs my complete attention, and here eight years later - that’s a pretty impressive feat, and one that is not lost on me. Spencer Krug has continued to evolve and grow as an artist (I can no longer say this or one of his early achievements stand as my favorite), but in doing so, it’s impossible to forget the places that grabbed me first. 
LISTEN to “A DAY IN THE GRAVEYARD II” by SUNSET RUBDOWN: (Soundcloud) // (YouTube) // (iTunes)
ZoomInfo

DREAMING IN REVERSE // #006

"A Day in the Graveyard II" by Sunset Rubdown (2006 // Global Symphonic)

I’ve been neglecting this little series that I began a couple of months back. It’s nothing more really than an excuse to post and perhaps shine a little light on some favorites of the past, but that’s a noble enough cause for me - so, please allow me to step back into the Dreaming in Reverse series, with a look at an early favorite from Spencer Krug. 

By January of 2006, I was deeply enamored with all things Wolf Parade. Especially the work of Spencer Krug. I had already played the living hell out of his first release as Sunset Rubdown (Snakes Got a Leg), and was in the midst of a several month long obsession with his contribution to the 2005 Believer Music issues, which was a stripped bare, haunting cover of a Frog Eyes track called “Claxxon’s Lament”. Thankfully, I was living with like minded friends at the time, so there was very little chance I would be choked to death for overplaying the same 20 or 30 songs whenever I got drunk enough to turn our kitchen/living room space into a bad karaoke party for those particular tracks. So, that January saw the release of a new Sunset Rubdown EP, which I was excited to get my hands on. The order had been placed, it was just a waiting game at that point, and a waiting I was. In fact, I was frustrated beyond belief that the EP was a couple of weeks late. The general excitement of life in New York that winter had managed to help me forget about my obsession - or rather, it helped develop multiple other obsessions with various other acts at that time. Sometime in February, I was coming home from work late, and upon checking my postal box, found those ordered copies, opened and seemingly listened to by someone in my building. I managed to push off the anger and annoyance for long enough to get inside and pop a copy into the stereo while I cleaned up and made a bite to eat.

Something strange happened. The first song played and failed to grab me. Then the next. And then a third. Still nothing magical. I killed the music and sat down for the night, already over the whole release. My year and a half long obsession must have subsided in the interim of receiving that EP. 

It wasn’t until early that spring, when I was walking through the East Village on my way to a birthday party for one of my roommates, that I remembered that I had added the Sunset Rubdown EP to my iPod, and decided to give it another shot. It must have been the general upbeat vibe of a breezy night on the town just after the cold breaks, because I was hearing those first three songs with new ears. I had tempered my expectations for sure, but I found myself getting caught up in the sound, which was an evolution of sorts for Krug’s sound. Less chaotic and more melodic and warm. Then I heard the buoyant intro to the fourth track, “A Day in the Graveyard II”. I was completely caught off guard. It was short, just over two minutes, but basically containing a thirty second intro of noise - but that melody, and the sweetly romantic composition just floored me. It felt like the Spring season opened up in the span of this one song, and everything felt curious and alive. I set the track to repeat as I made my way to the party. My mind dissecting the lyrics and imagining some film scene played out to the track - a lost lover pining for his absent other but accepting the end with an optimistic hope, rather than wallowing in pain. By the time I had arrived at the bar, I had already listened to the song a handful of times, and I even waited outside for the track to play through one last time before I stowed away the ipod in my bag. I remember that night so well, because I couldn’t stop humming, singing, and generally emoting that song - breaking it out and playing it for anyone who would listen. It was the kind of excitement for a song that doesn’t come along very often, but when it does it makes you fall in love with all music, not just the gem in question. 

By that point, Sunset Rubdown and Wolf Parade were just a part of my regular rotation, and Krug’s inability to stop and breath between projects kept me in new material of his for most of the next several years, but still to this day there’s something about re-discovering “A Day in the Graveyard II” that just sticks with me. It became a bit of a theme song for me that year, which found me in the midst of a slew of life changes, lost friends, and eye opening realizations - and even still, it’s nearly impossible for me to just listen to the song once and to move on. It always grabs my complete attention, and here eight years later - that’s a pretty impressive feat, and one that is not lost on me. Spencer Krug has continued to evolve and grow as an artist (I can no longer say this or one of his early achievements stand as my favorite), but in doing so, it’s impossible to forget the places that grabbed me first. 

LISTEN to “A DAY IN THE GRAVEYARD II” by SUNSET RUBDOWN: (Soundcloud) // (YouTube) // (iTunes)

CHVRCHES - Get Away

"Get Away" by CHVRCHES // Drive - ReScored (2014)

This is certainly something outside of the box. Nicolas Winding Refn's brilliant film, Drive, had what was undoubtedly one of the most riveting soundtracks in recent memory. It was not just a critical success, but a massive breakout hit due in part to the killer tracks chosen to accompany Cliff Martinez's hypnotic score (who incidentally was brought on last minute to replace synth-noir maestro, Johnny Jewel's original score). Suffice to say, despite some hiccups, the audio side of the film was an immediate success among fans. Now, fast forward a couple of years, and for some reason (boredom, perhaps), BBC Radio 1 host, Zane Lowe has commissioned an entirely new soundtrack from some of his favorite artists (including Foals, Jon Hopkins, BANKS, and much more), and managed to get the director’s blessing to re-score the film for a BBC 3 premiere at the end of the month. It certainly is an odd experiment, but hopefully one that will be fruitful for new and old fans of the film. Right now, you can here one of the contributions to the new score, “Get Away” by CHVRCHES. The new track feels fairly close to what was used the first time around - an emotionally driven synth pop jam that buzzes and pulsates with a melancholic atmosphere. It’s worth checking out, and if you like the idea and you live in the UK, you can check out Lowe’s re-scored version of Drive on BBC 3, the night of the 30th. 

THE HAUNTING SOUNDS vol. 2 // a Halloween Mixtape RePost
As a followup to the last post (essentially, a re-post), I thought it would only be right to return to the second collection in the Haunting Sounds series. Upon it’s original post, this particular entry was far and away the most popular. Inside this collection, you will find a batch of darker, more ominous sounds from the worlds of post punk, new wave, goth rock, and beyond. Some familiar, and some chosen for their atmospheric connection to some Halloween favorites, but all of them will be worthy additions to any Halloween party playlist! The compilation is presented here with updated links for downloading the mix as a single audio file. 
FEATURED MUSIC (click band name for more info)
“Monster Mash” by Selebrities
“Halloween” by Siouxsie and the Banshees
“Dead Souls” by Joy Division
“A Little Death to Laugh” by Cold Cave
“The Ghost” by I Love You But I’ve Chosen Darkness
“Unfolding Black Wings” by Violens
“Lullaby” by The Cure
“She Cries Alone” by Skeletal Family
“Halloween” by Sonic Youth
“Jack the Ripper” by The Horrors
“Demons” by Sleigh Bells
“You Are the One” by A Place to Bury Strangers
“Violent Cries” by Cold Showers
“Hell is Round the Corner” by Tricky
“Half Day Closing” by Portishead
“Die Life” by The Soft Moon
“Everyday is Halloween” by Ministry
“I Hope You Die” by Molly Nilsson
“The Killing Moon” by Echo and the Bunnymen
“Beauty Has Her Way” by Mummy Calls
“Under the Milky Way” by The Church
“See You Hurry” by WIM
“Cry Little Sister” by Gerard McMann
“Bela Lugosi’s Dead” by Nouvelle Vague
* (download/mp3) The Haunting Sounds : Volume 2 (Zippyshare) // (Soundcloud)
** (stream) The Entire Mix @ 8TRACKS // The Entire Mix @ Soundcloud
Please support the artists that you find and enjoy. Buy their music, merchandise and tickets to see their shows. Supporting them is the only purpose in doing this blog. Contrary to the opinions of some, music blogs are a great way to discover new music, but there will only be so much new music to go around if these artists can’t afford to support themselves through their art and commerce. Only use these mixtapes as a guide to find something to throw your (financial and emotional) support behind.

THE HAUNTING SOUNDS vol. 2 // a Halloween Mixtape RePost

As a followup to the last post (essentially, a re-post), I thought it would only be right to return to the second collection in the Haunting Sounds series. Upon it’s original post, this particular entry was far and away the most popular. Inside this collection, you will find a batch of darker, more ominous sounds from the worlds of post punk, new wave, goth rock, and beyond. Some familiar, and some chosen for their atmospheric connection to some Halloween favorites, but all of them will be worthy additions to any Halloween party playlist! The compilation is presented here with updated links for downloading the mix as a single audio file. 

FEATURED MUSIC (click band name for more info)

  1. “Monster Mash” by Selebrities
  2. “Halloween” by Siouxsie and the Banshees
  3. “Dead Souls” by Joy Division
  4. “A Little Death to Laugh” by Cold Cave
  5. “The Ghost” by I Love You But I’ve Chosen Darkness
  6. “Unfolding Black Wings” by Violens
  7. “Lullaby” by The Cure
  8. “She Cries Alone” by Skeletal Family
  9. “Halloween” by Sonic Youth
  10. “Jack the Ripper” by The Horrors
  11. “Demons” by Sleigh Bells
  12. “You Are the One” by A Place to Bury Strangers
  13. “Violent Cries” by Cold Showers
  14. “Hell is Round the Corner” by Tricky
  15. “Half Day Closing” by Portishead
  16. “Die Life” by The Soft Moon
  17. “Everyday is Halloween” by Ministry
  18. “I Hope You Die” by Molly Nilsson
  19. “The Killing Moon” by Echo and the Bunnymen
  20. “Beauty Has Her Way” by Mummy Calls
  21. “Under the Milky Way” by The Church
  22. “See You Hurry” by WIM
  23. “Cry Little Sister” by Gerard McMann
  24. “Bela Lugosi’s Dead” by Nouvelle Vague

* (download/mp3) The Haunting Sounds : Volume 2 (Zippyshare) // (Soundcloud)

** (stream) The Entire Mix @ 8TRACKS // The Entire Mix @ Soundcloud

Please support the artists that you find and enjoy. Buy their music, merchandise and tickets to see their shows. Supporting them is the only purpose in doing this blog. Contrary to the opinions of some, music blogs are a great way to discover new music, but there will only be so much new music to go around if these artists can’t afford to support themselves through their art and commerce. Only use these mixtapes as a guide to find something to throw your (financial and emotional) support behind.

THE HAUNTING SOUNDS vol. 1 // A Halloween Mixtape RePost
Over the course of time spent here at PMW, I’ve put together an absurd amount of Halloween mixtapes. Sadly, after a while, it gets pretty easy to exhaust the catalog of great spooky tunes. That being said, I really enjoyed the mixtapes from a couple of years ago, and they received a pretty great response - so, before I post this year’s addition, I thought it might be fun to bring back the aforementioned series, “The Haunting Sounds”. The first volume is comprised of songs that lean on the rock and roll side of things. Garage rock, surf rock, lo-fi, jangle pop, experimental rock - all filtered through a Halloween lens. The compilation is presented here with updated links for downloading the mix as a single audio file. 
FEATURED MUSIC (click band name for more info)
“The Monster Mash” by Bananaconda
“Do They Know it’s Halloween?” by North American Halloween Prevention Initiative
“Evil L.A. Girls” by The Raveonettes
“The Munster’s Theme” by The Comateens
“I Would Not Know the Devil” by The Fresh & Onlys
“Deadbeat Club” by The B-52s
“People Are Strange” by Echo & the Bunnymen
“The Curse” by Cults
“Surfin’ Dead” by The Cramps
“Halloween” by No Demons Here
“Diabolo’s Theme” by The Ghastly Ones
“Devil Doll” by Eban Schletter & Paul F. Tompkins
“Ghost in the Trees (Live Alternate)” by Thee Oh Sees
“Halloween All Year” by The Orwells
“The Killing Moon” by Pavement
“Devil Inside” by Beck / Liars / St. Vincent
“Ghost Rider” by Suicide
“Lone Runner” by Dirty Beaches
“A Night With the Jersey Devil” by Bruce Springsteen
“Night of the Vampire” by The Moontrekkers
“Sleepwalking” by Modest Mouse
“Dust to Dust” by Chromatics
“The Amazing Sounds of Orgy” by Radiohead
“Every Day is Halloween (reworked)” by The Postmarks
“Forever Lurking” by Eban Schletter and Grant Lee Phillips
* (download/mp3) The Haunting Sounds of Halloween (Zippyshare) // (SoundCloud)
* (stream) The Entire Mix at 8 Tracks // The Entire Mix at Soundcloud
Please support the artists that you find and enjoy. Buy their music, merchandise and tickets to see their shows. Supporting them is the only purpose in doing this blog. Contrary to the opinions of some, music blogs are a great way to discover new music, but there will only be so much new music to go around if these artists can’t afford to support themselves through their art and commerce. Only use these mixtapes as a guide to find something to throw your (financial and emotional) support behind. 

THE HAUNTING SOUNDS vol. 1 // A Halloween Mixtape RePost

Over the course of time spent here at PMW, I’ve put together an absurd amount of Halloween mixtapes. Sadly, after a while, it gets pretty easy to exhaust the catalog of great spooky tunes. That being said, I really enjoyed the mixtapes from a couple of years ago, and they received a pretty great response - so, before I post this year’s addition, I thought it might be fun to bring back the aforementioned series, “The Haunting Sounds”. The first volume is comprised of songs that lean on the rock and roll side of things. Garage rock, surf rock, lo-fi, jangle pop, experimental rock - all filtered through a Halloween lens. The compilation is presented here with updated links for downloading the mix as a single audio file. 

FEATURED MUSIC (click band name for more info)

  1. “The Monster Mash” by Bananaconda
  2. “Do They Know it’s Halloween?” by North American Halloween Prevention Initiative
  3. “Evil L.A. Girls” by The Raveonettes
  4. “The Munster’s Theme” by The Comateens
  5. “I Would Not Know the Devil” by The Fresh & Onlys
  6. “Deadbeat Club” by The B-52s
  7. “People Are Strange” by Echo & the Bunnymen
  8. “The Curse” by Cults
  9. “Surfin’ Dead” by The Cramps
  10. “Halloween” by No Demons Here
  11. “Diabolo’s Theme” by The Ghastly Ones
  12. “Devil Doll” by Eban Schletter & Paul F. Tompkins
  13. “Ghost in the Trees (Live Alternate)” by Thee Oh Sees
  14. “Halloween All Year” by The Orwells
  15. “The Killing Moon” by Pavement
  16. “Devil Inside” by Beck / Liars / St. Vincent
  17. “Ghost Rider” by Suicide
  18. “Lone Runner” by Dirty Beaches
  19. “A Night With the Jersey Devil” by Bruce Springsteen
  20. “Night of the Vampire” by The Moontrekkers
  21. “Sleepwalking” by Modest Mouse
  22. “Dust to Dust” by Chromatics
  23. “The Amazing Sounds of Orgy” by Radiohead
  24. “Every Day is Halloween (reworked)” by The Postmarks
  25. “Forever Lurking” by Eban Schletter and Grant Lee Phillips

* (download/mp3) The Haunting Sounds of Halloween (Zippyshare) // (SoundCloud)

* (stream) The Entire Mix at 8 Tracks // The Entire Mix at Soundcloud

Please support the artists that you find and enjoy. Buy their music, merchandise and tickets to see their shows. Supporting them is the only purpose in doing this blog. Contrary to the opinions of some, music blogs are a great way to discover new music, but there will only be so much new music to go around if these artists can’t afford to support themselves through their art and commerce. Only use these mixtapes as a guide to find something to throw your (financial and emotional) support behind. 

Swim Dream

"Swim Dream"  by Ludvig Moon // Ludvig Moon EP (Out Now via Riot Factory)

"Swim Dream" has something special. Right off the bat, I was pretty sure of that. In fact, the first time that i heard the song, from the Oslo based dream/orchestral pop act, Ludvig Moon - I spent the next several minutes realizing that it was something that i didn’t even realize that I missed. It’s the sound (or vibe, i guess) that I missed. How can I miss something that I hadn’t heard? Well, it’s not that I had heard this particular gorgeous blast of blissful orchestral pop, before - but it calls to mind a kind of sound that maybe hit it’s peak with the release of Sufjan Stevens' Illinois album. There’s a sweetly, optimistic and natural atmosphere at play amidst the strings and choral vocals. Despite the similarity to the sounds of an album almost a decade old, it doesn’t feel stale or retreaded. What Ludvig Moon does here is build a majestic beauty that is rarely heard these days in the era of everything-darker, everything-minimal or electronic. “Swim Dream” is a wonderful track and an exciting introduction to a band that’s kind of going against the grain a bit, but in spite of all that hyperbole, what really matters is that this is an excellent song - period. I can’t stop listening. 

Obituary

"Obituary" by Carpenter Brut // EP II (Out Now via Bandcamp)

If you’re looking for some ominous synthed-up electro sounds to darken up the corners of your Halloween parties, look no further than one year ago when Carpenter Brut dropped their second EP. That’s right, i’m late as hell to this party but it’s Halloween season and time be damned. Certainly, the bandname is in reference to the work of legendary filmmaker/musician John Carpenter's brilliant soundtrack work over the years, and they do the name justice. “Obituary” wastes no time in establishing a shadow-y world of eerie synth tones and pulsing programmed beats - which build to an intense, robotic voiced climax that would be perfectly at home on any self-respecting halloween dance party - or scoring a wicked night chase under neon-hued city lights. Whatever the case, you're in good hands with Carpenter Brut's brand of sinister retro-electro.

GAZE IS GHOST - Revolvere

"Revolvere" by Gaze is Ghost // Revolvere b/w Murmuration (Out 10.20.14 vis Bandcamp)

Laura McGarrigle (the artist behind Gaze is Ghost) hails from Northern Ireland, but to hear her powerful, focused brand of ethereal orchestral pop, you could possibly be convinced that she’s from another plane of existence entirely. McGarrigle’s voice has always been a stirring, potent weapon, but on her new single, “Revolvere”, her gift has grown by leaps and bounds - so has her overall sound for that matter. The new single is one of the best tracks of the fall, and it’s in no small part due to the hauntingly minimal production that manages to feel intimate and personal, while simultaneously displaying a widescreen, cinematic power that is rare and absolutely something to cherish. Highest possible recommendation for fans of Julianna Barwick, Julia Holter, and Angel Olsen.

UNDER a HALLOWEEN MOON // A Halloween Megamix (Spotify)
After several years of making all sorts of Halloween mixtapes - I’ve long ago exhausted the general supply of go-to spooky jams. With that in mind, I knew that this year I was going to have to get creative in more ways than one. So, as we are a couple of weeks out from the best day of the year, I feel it’s time to start sharing some of my favorite sounds of the season - in various capacities. Up first is a six-hour megamix of Halloween tracks that range from some new wave classics all the way up to modern day gems loaded with eerie atmospherics. Some of them may not jump right out as a Halloween connection, but give it a listen and you’ll be surprised at what you find. 
The overall sound sways from post-punk and lo-fi to shoegaze and synth pop to dream pop and electronic - and everything in between. Considering it’s six hours of eerie goodness (and more will be added as the days go by), it’s perhaps best experienced on random. It would make for a solid party playlist, but naturally it could be your soundtrack just about whatever you can imagine. 
Some of the featured artists are:
The Marshmallow Ghosts // Camp Counselors // John Carpenter // Radiohead // The Cure // The Casket Girls // Echo & the Bunnymen // Metric // Beach House // Sonic Youth // TV on the Radio // Cemeteries // M83 // Joy Division // Nick Cave // Dead Man’s Bones // Goblin // David Bowie // Wolf Parade // Cocteau Twins // Interpol // Arcade Fire // Tegan and Sara // FM Attack // Siouxsie & the Banshees // Mazzy Star // and many, many more…
Thank you for listening, sharing, and celebrating Halloween! 
* Direct link to Spotify Playlist: Under A Halloween Moon
** Non Spotify playlists will post throughout the coming days.

UNDER a HALLOWEEN MOON // A Halloween Megamix (Spotify)

After several years of making all sorts of Halloween mixtapes - I’ve long ago exhausted the general supply of go-to spooky jams. With that in mind, I knew that this year I was going to have to get creative in more ways than one. So, as we are a couple of weeks out from the best day of the year, I feel it’s time to start sharing some of my favorite sounds of the season - in various capacities. Up first is a six-hour megamix of Halloween tracks that range from some new wave classics all the way up to modern day gems loaded with eerie atmospherics. Some of them may not jump right out as a Halloween connection, but give it a listen and you’ll be surprised at what you find. 

The overall sound sways from post-punk and lo-fi to shoegaze and synth pop to dream pop and electronic - and everything in between. Considering it’s six hours of eerie goodness (and more will be added as the days go by), it’s perhaps best experienced on random. It would make for a solid party playlist, but naturally it could be your soundtrack just about whatever you can imagine. 

Some of the featured artists are:

The Marshmallow Ghosts // Camp Counselors // John Carpenter // Radiohead // The Cure // The Casket Girls // Echo & the Bunnymen // Metric // Beach House // Sonic Youth // TV on the Radio // Cemeteries // M83 // Joy Division // Nick Cave // Dead Man’s Bones // Goblin // David Bowie // Wolf Parade // Cocteau Twins // Interpol // Arcade Fire // Tegan and Sara // FM Attack // Siouxsie & the Banshees // Mazzy Star // and many, many more…

Thank you for listening, sharing, and celebrating Halloween! 

* Direct link to Spotify Playlist: Under A Halloween Moon

** Non Spotify playlists will post throughout the coming days.

Alex Calder // Strange Dreams

"Strange Dreams" by Alex Calder // Strange Dreams (Physical Release Out 1.20.15 via Captured Tracks)

Last Year, Alex Calder released Time, an EP of laid back, hazy psych pop that called to mind the work of his labelmate and former bandmate (in the now defunct, Makeout Videotape), Mac DeMarco. Of course, just relying on that comparison does the artist zero good, and luckily, his forthcoming LP, Strange Dreams, will go a long way in continuing to establish Calder’s voice. On the forthcoming album’s title track, Calder digs deep in his arsenal of talents and comes back with an infectiously charming gem built from punchy drums, jangly guitars, and layered/distorted vocal harmonies. It’s the kind of shaggy, lo-fi beauty that you would find on early Deerhunter (or Atlas Sound, for that matter) records. Calder has been and continues to be an artist to watch, and “Strange Dreams” is just further proof that he’s been worth the wait. Highly recommeded!

(Source: yvynyl / capturedtracks)

PMW & Halloween

It’s been pretty clear that I’m not living up to my usual Halloweening here at Perfect|Midnight|World, and there’s actually a bit of a reason. In the first couple of years of the blog, and Halloween, I would go nuts with the mixtapes and the posts and it was a ton of fun. I continued to do that up through last year, which took a hit when a personal tragedy kept me from participating as usual in the weeks surrounding the holiday. Over time I started to realize that I was going to be running out of Halloween related jams very quickly. It’s not like every year there’s a cavalcade of musicians waiting to write songs about pumpkins and ghosts and things. So, when I started to put together playlists for this year, I was seeing a lot of repeats - which has lead me to rethink the whole thing.

Starting tomorrow, I’m going to start posting my Halloween treats in the form of a variety of things - video breakdowns or old favorites, reposts of the better spooky mixtapes of PMW past, a couple of new atmospherically themed compilations, and of course whatever excellent Halloween treats that I find floating around the blogosphere (ie, like the brilliant Snowbeast Records Halloween Comps). that I want to share. I’ll continue to update through the end of the month, at which time I’m going to be moving and might be on hiatus for a week or two. In the meantime, I hope that you’re all enjoying the gorgeous seasonal weather and whatever Halloween treats that you find yourself a part of - celebrate often and celebrate hard. 

Be Safe / Take Care, 

Steve @ PMW

All The Girl Are Grey

"All the Girls are Grey" by The Homesick // Twst yr Wrsts (Out Now via Bandcamp)

It’s pretty easy to fall in love with the dreampunk sounds of The Homesick. The Dokkum, Holland based three piece create music that sounds at times chaotic, but always hyper melodic. There’s an energy piled into every song that feels youthful, but earned - it’s not achieved by accident. These guys are just really good at what they do. A healthy sample of what they do is now available in the form of their new 6-track EP, Twst Yr Wrsts, and especially in the ultra-infectious gem, “All the Girls are Grey”. That track in particular, with its rolling percussion and shimmering guitars, is a standout in an EP of standouts. Check it out above, and then check out the rest of the EP at Bandcamp!

02CoffinInHouston (SINGLE)

"Coffin in Houston" by Suzie // Born Single (Out Now via No Problem Records / Bandcamp)

I love it when a recommendation falls into my lap that turns out perfect. That’s definitely the case here with “Coffin in Houston” by the Minneapolis based musician Mark Ritsema, who works under the name Suzie. Thankfully, my dear friend who recommended the track, knows me well enough to know that this is just the kind of warped pop gem that keeps me up at night spinning a song on repeat. The beauty of “Coffin in Houston” is that it sounds like a psych pop beauty blasted through a time machine that catches parts of late 70’s power pop, mid-80’s synth pop, and latter year dream pop sounds. There’s no distinct genre with which Ritsema settles into, and that’s where the good stuff lives. On first listen, I thought I was catching a little bit of Ariel Pink influence, and maybe some of the Radio Dept, but as soon as I was committing to those sounds - I started picking up some early Def Leppard and Kim Carnes (mostly, “Bette Davis Eyes” reflected off of a fun house mirror). All that is to say - this song is the fucking cat’s pajamas, and you’d be doing yourself a favor to swing over to Bandcamp to grab the EP for a name-your-price fee! You won’t regret it. In fact, it might just become your jam of the season.

Dust

"Dust" by Halos // Dust - Single (Out Now // 2014)

It’s easy these days to fall in love with sounds that originate from the unknown. Well, “the unknown” sounds dramatic, but what I mean is from an artist that is currently lacking an official press release. Halos is a trio from London, and at the moment, that’s about all I know about them, outside of adoring their first single proper, “Dust”. And quite frankly, that’s enough. “Dust” is a soulful electronic track that reverberates with darkly textured atmospherics, sounding at times melancholic, other times sexy - but always enchanting. It’s hard not to play it on repeat. Apparently, there’s an EP on the way, but as of now - we just have the warning shot of a potentially exciting new project. Here’s hoping that they waste no time in capitalizing on the promise of this stellar debut track. 

Wakesbe good (waxahatchee cover)

"Be Good" by Wakes // Originally by Waxahatchee (2014)

Covering a song that is a fan favorite seems like it’s a fruitless task. On one hand, you’re taking on a song with a built in fan base. On the other hand, that fan base is usually die hard about their love for the track and unforgiving at the slightest hiccup. Boston’s lo-fi Wakes has decided to take on the Waxahatchee cult classic, “Be Good”. Luckily, for Wakes, they didn’t exactly stick to the original per se. In the hands of Katie Crutchfield, the track is a melancholic acoustic number that owes much of it’s effectiveness to her delicate delivery. Here, Wakes pushes more into a shimmering surf-pop sound that is anchored by a new romantic vocal  that would be at home in a post punk jam. It makes for an excellent listen, even if it’s not quite as powerful as the original, it’s captivating all the same. You can grab a copy at Bandcamp for name-your-price!