Golden Hair

"Golden Hair" by Balms // Golden Hair - Single (2014)

We’re deep into Summer, so naturally I’m looking for every opportunity imaginable to listen to songs that take to a more autumnal state. A couple of lucky clicks on Bandcamp landed me at the perfect song to help with my dilemma - “Golden Hair” by San Francisco shoegazers, Balms. “Golden Hair” is a gorgeous, dreamy slice of glimmering shoegaze. Crashing drums and layers of cascading guitars move together with dreamy vocals to build a haunting atmospheric gem. It’s the kind of song that feels like summer’s ending. Those golden-hued evenings fading faster with each passing day, and with a beauty like “Golden Hair” soundtracking your nights, you’re not likely to miss them in the least. Highly recommended for fans of Film School, The Bilinda Butchers, and The Radio Dept

Roxanne

"Roxanne" by Main Beach // Roxanne - Single (Available Now via Bandcamp)

It’s kind of useless to try and explain the draw of a band like Sydney’s Main Beach. It’s just so easy to love. A pretty melody and an infectious hook laid over dreamy beach pop guitars. What’s not to love? I get that it’s not kicking the doors down and demanding your attention in some aggressive grab at being important, but that’s the beauty of Main Beach. They are able to capture the halcyon days of young adulthood in a four minute summer pop gem that feels romantic and hazy and chill. It’s just great music for quiet times. 

Perfect Midnight Radio // Ep.4

PERFECT|MIDNIGHT|RADIO // Episode Four

This month’s episode of Perfect|Midnight|Radio is arriving a little later than planned, so I’ve switched things up a bit to get it in place sooner rather than later. This time around we’re going for one extended episode instead of two hour long pieces. Same rules apply as always, a collection of mostly new mixed with some favorites of years gone by, curated to compliment each other and encourage discovery. This month’s mix is especially exciting as this summer has been particularly great for new dream pop, shoegaze, and psych pop. . Hopefully, the selections succeed in offering a comfortable contrast to the impending dog days of summer. The sounds of this longplay dreamwave lullaby might be just the sound to cool your after hours.  As always, you can stream from Soundcloud, or download as a standalone mp3 mixtape to take on the go. 

Please feel free to share and I encourage you to seek out the artists that catch your attention - they might be your new favorite band. Thanks for listening. Enjoy!

EPISODE 4 TRACKLIST: (Stream) // (Download MP3 via Soundcloud)

* Perfect|Midnight|Radio EP. 4 (Stream/Download)

**Please support the artists that you find and enjoy. Buy their music, merchandise and tickets to see their shows. Only use these mixtapes as a guide to find something to throw your (financial and emotional) support behind.

DREAMING IN REVERSE // #003
"Song from the Edge of the World" by Siouxsie & the Banshees (1987 // Polydor)
When I decided to start the process of building a catalog of favorite “forgotten” songs from years gone by, it was songs like this that I had in mind. Of course, it’s kind of hard to say any song by a band as influential as Siouxsie & the Banshees is “forgotten”, but over the years “Song from the Edge of the World” has certainly fallen into the rarer side of things. 
I first encountered the song in 1997 on a mixtape that an older friend played religiously in his barely functioning 1986 Ford Taurus. The mixtape had made the long journey from Sacramento by way of another friend’s cousin, which was left in that friend’s car while on a family trip to Utah, which eventually made it’s way to our hands in Michigan a year or two later. And it was that ragged sort of discovery that made us crazy about what was contained within. The tracklist was long gone and the bulk of the songs were b-sides from post punk and new wave bands that we recognized but couldn’t begin to place. But it was this song, which closed out Side One that I was mildly obsessed with for several years until I finally discovered it’s name and origin. Truth be told, I didn’t look too hard because I had a copy of the song on a mixtape of my own, but it was always labeled as just “Siouxsie”, because I’d managed to figure out the band fairly easily. That was enough. Over the next few years, I’d lost the tape and semi-forgotten about the song until one day in 2003, when I was passing through Denver and found myself wading through the stacks of used discs at the wonderful record store, Wax Trax. That familiar drum roll filled the speakers and I fell in love all over again. Luckily, at that point I was in an establishment that was staffed with a couple of guys who couldn’t be happier to fill me in on the name and availability of the track. “Song from the Edge of the World” had been a one off single from 1987 that the band had issued in limited release despite not being overly fond of the production sound. It had just recently been re-issued (in an extended mix) on the deluxe double disc edition of The Best of Siouxsie and the Banshees, and there, after several years of listening to worn out cassettes, I finally had a pristine digital copy with which to play the everloving shit out of until the end of time, or whenever I would lose that disc (two months later it was stolen out of my car while parked at my then apartment in East Lansing, Michigan). 
Growing up, I had always been a fan of the singles of Siouxsie & the Banshees, but it wasn’t until I was an adult that I really dove into the deep end of the discography and realized how many wonderful songs were hidden deep inside of some of their less popular albums.There have been many obsessions with many of those songs over the years, but “Song from the Edge of the World” has maintained a hold on my head and heart since that worn out, miles-journeyed mixtape.
I know, i know - I’ve explained the route the song took to find me, and later me to find it’s full story, but I haven’t talked of how it sounds. And honestly, I don’t think I can do it justice after all this time because it sounds like Halloween mixtapes and road trips through the mountains and getting drunk at the Library on Avenue A while waiting for friends on rainy autumn nights and it sounds like trying to get over losing friends and trying to make it through a flight from O’Hare to LAX without having an anxiety attack because while everything was changing at the speed of light, there were still some markers driven into memories that could make you feel better if only for the duration of a four minute song. That is to say it sounds like a great fucking song. 
LISTEN to “SONG FROM THE EDGE OF THE WORLD” by SIOUXSIE & THE BANSHEES: Soundcloud // YouTube // Spotify 
ZoomInfo
DREAMING IN REVERSE // #003
"Song from the Edge of the World" by Siouxsie & the Banshees (1987 // Polydor)
When I decided to start the process of building a catalog of favorite “forgotten” songs from years gone by, it was songs like this that I had in mind. Of course, it’s kind of hard to say any song by a band as influential as Siouxsie & the Banshees is “forgotten”, but over the years “Song from the Edge of the World” has certainly fallen into the rarer side of things. 
I first encountered the song in 1997 on a mixtape that an older friend played religiously in his barely functioning 1986 Ford Taurus. The mixtape had made the long journey from Sacramento by way of another friend’s cousin, which was left in that friend’s car while on a family trip to Utah, which eventually made it’s way to our hands in Michigan a year or two later. And it was that ragged sort of discovery that made us crazy about what was contained within. The tracklist was long gone and the bulk of the songs were b-sides from post punk and new wave bands that we recognized but couldn’t begin to place. But it was this song, which closed out Side One that I was mildly obsessed with for several years until I finally discovered it’s name and origin. Truth be told, I didn’t look too hard because I had a copy of the song on a mixtape of my own, but it was always labeled as just “Siouxsie”, because I’d managed to figure out the band fairly easily. That was enough. Over the next few years, I’d lost the tape and semi-forgotten about the song until one day in 2003, when I was passing through Denver and found myself wading through the stacks of used discs at the wonderful record store, Wax Trax. That familiar drum roll filled the speakers and I fell in love all over again. Luckily, at that point I was in an establishment that was staffed with a couple of guys who couldn’t be happier to fill me in on the name and availability of the track. “Song from the Edge of the World” had been a one off single from 1987 that the band had issued in limited release despite not being overly fond of the production sound. It had just recently been re-issued (in an extended mix) on the deluxe double disc edition of The Best of Siouxsie and the Banshees, and there, after several years of listening to worn out cassettes, I finally had a pristine digital copy with which to play the everloving shit out of until the end of time, or whenever I would lose that disc (two months later it was stolen out of my car while parked at my then apartment in East Lansing, Michigan). 
Growing up, I had always been a fan of the singles of Siouxsie & the Banshees, but it wasn’t until I was an adult that I really dove into the deep end of the discography and realized how many wonderful songs were hidden deep inside of some of their less popular albums.There have been many obsessions with many of those songs over the years, but “Song from the Edge of the World” has maintained a hold on my head and heart since that worn out, miles-journeyed mixtape.
I know, i know - I’ve explained the route the song took to find me, and later me to find it’s full story, but I haven’t talked of how it sounds. And honestly, I don’t think I can do it justice after all this time because it sounds like Halloween mixtapes and road trips through the mountains and getting drunk at the Library on Avenue A while waiting for friends on rainy autumn nights and it sounds like trying to get over losing friends and trying to make it through a flight from O’Hare to LAX without having an anxiety attack because while everything was changing at the speed of light, there were still some markers driven into memories that could make you feel better if only for the duration of a four minute song. That is to say it sounds like a great fucking song. 
LISTEN to “SONG FROM THE EDGE OF THE WORLD” by SIOUXSIE & THE BANSHEES: Soundcloud // YouTube // Spotify 
ZoomInfo
DREAMING IN REVERSE // #003
"Song from the Edge of the World" by Siouxsie & the Banshees (1987 // Polydor)
When I decided to start the process of building a catalog of favorite “forgotten” songs from years gone by, it was songs like this that I had in mind. Of course, it’s kind of hard to say any song by a band as influential as Siouxsie & the Banshees is “forgotten”, but over the years “Song from the Edge of the World” has certainly fallen into the rarer side of things. 
I first encountered the song in 1997 on a mixtape that an older friend played religiously in his barely functioning 1986 Ford Taurus. The mixtape had made the long journey from Sacramento by way of another friend’s cousin, which was left in that friend’s car while on a family trip to Utah, which eventually made it’s way to our hands in Michigan a year or two later. And it was that ragged sort of discovery that made us crazy about what was contained within. The tracklist was long gone and the bulk of the songs were b-sides from post punk and new wave bands that we recognized but couldn’t begin to place. But it was this song, which closed out Side One that I was mildly obsessed with for several years until I finally discovered it’s name and origin. Truth be told, I didn’t look too hard because I had a copy of the song on a mixtape of my own, but it was always labeled as just “Siouxsie”, because I’d managed to figure out the band fairly easily. That was enough. Over the next few years, I’d lost the tape and semi-forgotten about the song until one day in 2003, when I was passing through Denver and found myself wading through the stacks of used discs at the wonderful record store, Wax Trax. That familiar drum roll filled the speakers and I fell in love all over again. Luckily, at that point I was in an establishment that was staffed with a couple of guys who couldn’t be happier to fill me in on the name and availability of the track. “Song from the Edge of the World” had been a one off single from 1987 that the band had issued in limited release despite not being overly fond of the production sound. It had just recently been re-issued (in an extended mix) on the deluxe double disc edition of The Best of Siouxsie and the Banshees, and there, after several years of listening to worn out cassettes, I finally had a pristine digital copy with which to play the everloving shit out of until the end of time, or whenever I would lose that disc (two months later it was stolen out of my car while parked at my then apartment in East Lansing, Michigan). 
Growing up, I had always been a fan of the singles of Siouxsie & the Banshees, but it wasn’t until I was an adult that I really dove into the deep end of the discography and realized how many wonderful songs were hidden deep inside of some of their less popular albums.There have been many obsessions with many of those songs over the years, but “Song from the Edge of the World” has maintained a hold on my head and heart since that worn out, miles-journeyed mixtape.
I know, i know - I’ve explained the route the song took to find me, and later me to find it’s full story, but I haven’t talked of how it sounds. And honestly, I don’t think I can do it justice after all this time because it sounds like Halloween mixtapes and road trips through the mountains and getting drunk at the Library on Avenue A while waiting for friends on rainy autumn nights and it sounds like trying to get over losing friends and trying to make it through a flight from O’Hare to LAX without having an anxiety attack because while everything was changing at the speed of light, there were still some markers driven into memories that could make you feel better if only for the duration of a four minute song. That is to say it sounds like a great fucking song. 
LISTEN to “SONG FROM THE EDGE OF THE WORLD” by SIOUXSIE & THE BANSHEES: Soundcloud // YouTube // Spotify 
ZoomInfo

DREAMING IN REVERSE // #003

"Song from the Edge of the World" by Siouxsie & the Banshees (1987 // Polydor)

When I decided to start the process of building a catalog of favorite “forgotten” songs from years gone by, it was songs like this that I had in mind. Of course, it’s kind of hard to say any song by a band as influential as Siouxsie & the Banshees is “forgotten”, but over the years “Song from the Edge of the World” has certainly fallen into the rarer side of things. 

I first encountered the song in 1997 on a mixtape that an older friend played religiously in his barely functioning 1986 Ford Taurus. The mixtape had made the long journey from Sacramento by way of another friend’s cousin, which was left in that friend’s car while on a family trip to Utah, which eventually made it’s way to our hands in Michigan a year or two later. And it was that ragged sort of discovery that made us crazy about what was contained within. The tracklist was long gone and the bulk of the songs were b-sides from post punk and new wave bands that we recognized but couldn’t begin to place. But it was this song, which closed out Side One that I was mildly obsessed with for several years until I finally discovered it’s name and origin. Truth be told, I didn’t look too hard because I had a copy of the song on a mixtape of my own, but it was always labeled as just “Siouxsie”, because I’d managed to figure out the band fairly easily. That was enough. Over the next few years, I’d lost the tape and semi-forgotten about the song until one day in 2003, when I was passing through Denver and found myself wading through the stacks of used discs at the wonderful record store, Wax Trax. That familiar drum roll filled the speakers and I fell in love all over again. Luckily, at that point I was in an establishment that was staffed with a couple of guys who couldn’t be happier to fill me in on the name and availability of the track. “Song from the Edge of the World” had been a one off single from 1987 that the band had issued in limited release despite not being overly fond of the production sound. It had just recently been re-issued (in an extended mix) on the deluxe double disc edition of The Best of Siouxsie and the Banshees, and there, after several years of listening to worn out cassettes, I finally had a pristine digital copy with which to play the everloving shit out of until the end of time, or whenever I would lose that disc (two months later it was stolen out of my car while parked at my then apartment in East Lansing, Michigan). 

Growing up, I had always been a fan of the singles of Siouxsie & the Banshees, but it wasn’t until I was an adult that I really dove into the deep end of the discography and realized how many wonderful songs were hidden deep inside of some of their less popular albums.There have been many obsessions with many of those songs over the years, but “Song from the Edge of the World” has maintained a hold on my head and heart since that worn out, miles-journeyed mixtape.

I know, i know - I’ve explained the route the song took to find me, and later me to find it’s full story, but I haven’t talked of how it sounds. And honestly, I don’t think I can do it justice after all this time because it sounds like Halloween mixtapes and road trips through the mountains and getting drunk at the Library on Avenue A while waiting for friends on rainy autumn nights and it sounds like trying to get over losing friends and trying to make it through a flight from O’Hare to LAX without having an anxiety attack because while everything was changing at the speed of light, there were still some markers driven into memories that could make you feel better if only for the duration of a four minute song. That is to say it sounds like a great fucking song. 

LISTEN to “SONG FROM THE EDGE OF THE WORLD” by SIOUXSIE & THE BANSHEES: Soundcloud // YouTube // Spotify 

Evil is Always One Step Behind

"Evil is Always One Step Behind" // by Pale Seas // Places to Haunt (Out 8.11.14 via Native Pop)

The first single from the forthcoming Pale Seas EP, Places to Haunt, was released recently, but you can now stream the entire collection via Soundcloud. Even better news is that one of the best songs of the past several months can be found on that EP, in the form of the haunting, mesmerizing 7 minute stunner, “Evil is Always One Step Behind”. Pale Seas have been on my radar for a while now, and I’ve loved everything that they’ve released (including earlier versions of this song) but with this track, they step into a whole new light. No longer a young band with some great songs, this is a great band with an extremely bright future ahead of them. I can’t wait to hear what happens next, but in the meantime, i’m content to spend several months randomly listening to “Evil is Always One Step Behind” on repeat. 

*Check out the video for “Evil is Always One Step Behind”

Let U Know

"Let U Know" by How to Dress Well // What Is This Heart (Bonus Cut) (Available Now via Domino/Weird World)

It’s been a little over a month since the release of the third album by How to Dress Well. In that time, the album saw the release of several versions of the format release, one of which was the expanded triple pack LP, which featured two bonus cuts that didn’t make the final cut of the album. “Let U Know” is one of those songs, and it’s now streaming from the artist’s Soundcloud page with a little information on the track’s origins:

“In singing ‘Let U Know,’ I discovered the title of my album and a lot of its meaning—I needed this song to be heard by people, even though I couldn’t find a place for it on the album proper. When I made this song, singing over a song originally by one of my best friends, a lot of what I’d developed on “WITH?” just came clear to me—these questions, these relationships with the past and the future, all this love…”

Go ahead and stream the aching, minimalist beauty now. It may not have made the final cut of the album, but that doesn’t mean the quality is suffering in the least. Highest recommendation. 

Astronauts, etc.: Fuss

"Fuss" by Astronauts, etc. // Sadie EP (Out 9.6.14 via Hit City U.S.A.)

And here a friend and I were just talking about how we were wondering when Bay area producer, Anthony Ferraro (Astronauts, etc.) was going to drop some new sounds. As luck would have it, damn near immediately. Ferraro has recently with a new label (Hit City U.S.A.) and has a new EP on the way this September. Up first though, is the new single, “Fuss” which finds the artist in excellent form. The new track continues Ferraro’s genre mashup experimentations - bringing his grasp on sexy R&B sounds and integrating psych pop and dream pop sounds to create a gorgeous and smooth sound that can provide as much excitement for a night out on town beneath city lights as it would a quiet night with a special someone, or hell - just about wherever you want to hear something great. Keep an eye peeled on Astronauts, etc. because Ferraro feels primed for a breakout. 

Beneath The Air

"Beneath The Air" by Absolutely Free // Absolutely Free (Out 10.14.14 via Lefse Records)

It’s pretty great when you hear something that just sounds like a discovery. Not necessarily that it’s the first time that you’ve even heard a particular band or artist, but that time when you were forced to take notice. Hearing the first official single from Absolutely Free's forthcoming self-titled debut has that feeling. It's a song permeating warm energy that feels like it is positively free from gravity. From the gently propulsive drum loop to the twinkling synths to the hypnotic underlying percussion and onto the gorgeous light as air vocals, there is not a misplaced note to be heard. If I wasn't giving Absolutely Free my full attention before, “Beneath the Air” locked it down for the foreseeable future. 

Iroquois

"Iroquois" by Cemeteries // Track & Field Summer Compilation Vol. 1 (Out 7.29.14 via Track and Field Records)

It’s been a pretty great summer (so far) for random one off singles and pre-release promos. The result usually finds me adding another name to my list of anticipated releases. When it comes to Cemeteries, it’s a name that stays on top of the list. Kyle J. Reigle’s haunting dream pop project is currently do for a new full length sometime in the next few months (release date TBD). In the meantime, Reigle’s contribution to the forthcoming Summer compilation from Track & Field records is here to satiate that hunger/anticipation. “Iroquois” finds the artist expanding and exploring new areas of his sound. There’s an ominous urgency here that calls to mind the earlier post-punk days of The Cure, but at the same time “Iroquois” feels one hundred percent like Cemeteries - which is always a good thing. In a very short amount of time, Reigle’s work has developed into a signature that feels wholly his own. When I look around at other bands exploring dream pop and shoegaze sounds, no one is doing it like Cemeteries. There’s an eerily beautiful atmosphere hovering over these tracks, that feels cinematic and alive in a way that very few artists are capturing these days, and it’s just one more reason to be excited for whatever is coming down the line from Cemeteries. 

Be sure to check out volume one of the Track & Field Summer Compilation, for this and many other tracks from up and coming artists. Of course, be sure to keep an eye peeled for that sophomore release from Cemeteries later this year. Highest possible recommendation. 

When I Was Dead

"When I Was Dead" by Corduroy Capes // Winter EP (Out Now via Bandcamp)

In trying to play catch up with all of the new music that I should be listening to - I keep getting sucked in by great tunes that end up absorbing hours of my day. One of my recent obsessions is Toronto’s Corduroy Capes (Brian Vendiola) and his new EP, Winter. It’s only three tracks deep, but Vendiola makes excellent use of his time. The centerpiece is “When I Was Dead”, an autumnal bit of dream pop that has post punk blood coursing through it’s veins. It’s a woozy sort of beauty that genuinely feels like a dream. A chilly beat chugs forward through airy atmospherics as glimmering guitars and distant, hazy vocals provide an instantly memorable melody that you want to hear over and over again. It’s a stellar track. One of the best to come down the line in a few months. Keep an eye peeled for Corduroy Capes. This is something really incredible. Highly recommended for fans of Prince Innocence, The Snow, and Minks.

DEAD AND BURIED

"Dead and Buried" by Main Beach // Dead and Buried - Single (Out Now // Free Download via Bandcamp)

You know that feeling that you get when you hear a song and you just know that you’re going to spend a lot of time listening to it on repeat? I had that feeling immediately upon hearing “Dead and Buried” from Sydney’s Main Beach. For four minutes you are transported to that place where nostalgia meets reality - the end of a perfect summer before heading back to school, or that place where that crush you’ve harbored for months transitions to somethign serious and there’s no going back. It’s that sort of youthful nostalgia that permeates throughout every note of “Dead and Buried”. On face value, it could as well just be a laid back summer beach jam, but there’s a faded beauty to it that feels more melancholic than triumphant. It’s a killer track and one that you can grab for free at Bandcamp right now. Highly recommended for fans of Ducktails, Seapony, and Sea Lions.

AniloreGigondas

"Gigondas" by Anilore // Dead Love’s Grave (Out Now via Bandcamp)

Sometimes it’s just hard to hear all of the wonderful things that are waiting for hungry ears. Luckily, i’ve managed to squirrel away a little time catch up as of late, and finding things like the new album from New York shoegazers, Anilore, makes it worth while. “Gigondas” is one of the many highlights to be found on Anilore’s new album, Dead Love’s Grave. It’s the kind of sound that wraps itself around you in an ethereal haze. The kind of song that sounds like it was designed to soundtrack a quiet walk home on a chilly autumn night. There is an otherworldly atmosphere wrapped throughout that calls to mind the strange beauty of past acts like This Mortal Coil while also tapping into the lonely, heartbreaking chamber pop of contemporaries like Gem Club. There’s a lot to love here and a lot in which to lose yourself. You can stream the whole, wonderful album at Bandcamp right now. Highly recommended. 

If Only

"If Only" by White Peaks // Omnipresence (Available Now via Bandcamp)

Randomly stumbling upon a great track is one of my favorite things. You’re not expecting much and then the next thing that you know, you’ve listened to it on repeat for like 30 minutes and you’re texting friends to share the find. “If Only” by White Peaks is just such a song. White Peaks is the work of Brighton based musician, Matt Carington, but don’t expect a small, bedroom pop sound because of the one-man band - “If Only” is a sweetly melancholic ballad that positively soars once the chorus hits. The track has the kind of widescreen, cinematic sound that you would expect it to be scoring the trailer to some heartbreaking film trailer, and I wouldn’t be surprised if that happens fairly soon. White Peaks is definitely an act to watch. There’s some really wonderful work taking place on Omnipresence. Check it out now over at Bandcamp

Handsome Ghost - The Trapeze Swinger

"The Trapeze Swinger" by Handsome Ghost // Blood Stutter EP (Out Now via Color Study)

There was a period of time when I was a pretty big fan of Iron & Wine's music. Over the years as Sam Beam has explored different sounds, I’ve lost some of that connection that I felt to the music he released pre-2006. That being said, I still enjoy those early records and from a straight lyrical standpoint, one could argue that “The Trapeze Swinger” is right up there with his best. It’s also almost ten minutes long, which is just a couple of the reasons that I was a bit nervous about how a cover by Massachusetts based indie-electro-pop artist, Handsome Ghost, might sound. Turns out, I didn’t need to be nervous at all. Handsome Ghost’s take on “The Trapeze Swinger” tucks and shifts things around in a way that keeps the melancholic beauty of the original, but updates it with an ambient pop delivery that manages to shave three minutes off the run time, but still keep a good bit of the emotional punch. Those who love the original might find the electronics a little jarring, but it all balances out nicely and holds true to the original track’s heart-on-sleeve confessionals. It’s a really nice (and ballsy) take on a damn near classic from the aughts. 

Pale Seas - Wicked Dreams

"Wicked Dreams" by Pale Seas // Places to Haunt (Out 8.11.14 via Native Pop)

I feel like I’ve been waiting forever to hear an official release from Pale Seas. Apparently, I was waiting for long enough to let this one slip by me. After 2012’s jaw droppingly good single, “Bodies”, let’s just say that I’d listen to anything that the band released. Luckily, they’re on the verge of dropping they’re debut EP (Places to Haunt) and the official single, “Wicked Dreams” is another slice of dreamy folk pop rich with lovely harmonies and shimmering guitars. It’s a must listen, and highly recommended for fans of Fear of Men, Veronica Falls, and The Pains of Being Pure at Heart

(Source: yvynyl / Pale Seas)